Description

Japan, circa 1920
An important ivory and ivory veneer pagoda, with a cylindrical shaft, octagonal roof and base, the body carved in relief with Rakan (Buddhist saints) among trees, on the waves, against a background of clouds and near dragons or mythical animals. It opens through two doors with silver Kanamono locks decorated with a shishi and peonies, revealing four deities, including the Buddha seated in meditation on a lotus, surrounded by three Bodhisattvas. The base and roof are decorated with animated scenes of Rakan, friezes of dragons and lotus leaves, dragon-headed ridges punctuating the roof surmounted by an openwork dragon finial. With octagonal saddle of curved form, in wood carved with dragons.
(Small accidents, missing parts, restorations)
Height pagoda: 63 cm - Height saddle: 32.5 cm.

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Japan, circa 1920 An important ivory and ivory veneer pagoda, with a cylindrical shaft, octagonal roof and base, the body carved in relief with Rakan (Buddhist saints) among trees, on the waves, against a background of clouds and near dragons or mythical animals. It opens through two doors with silver Kanamono locks decorated with a shishi and peonies, revealing four deities, including the Buddha seated in meditation on a lotus, surrounded by three Bodhisattvas. The base and roof are decorated with animated scenes of Rakan, friezes of dragons and lotus leaves, dragon-headed ridges punctuating the roof surmounted by an openwork dragon finial. With octagonal saddle of curved form, in wood carved with dragons. (Small accidents, missing parts, restorations) Height pagoda: 63 cm - Height saddle: 32.5 cm.

Estimate 6 000 - 8 000 EUR

* Not including buyer’s premium.
Please read the conditions of sale for more information.

Sale fees: 30 %
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Location of the item :
France - 75009 - paris

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Sale Information

For sale on Tuesday 07 Dec - 14:00 (CET)
paris, France
Gros & Delettrez
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